Geraldo Rivera has slammed the whistleblower who helped expose Donald Trump‘s call with Ukraine‘s president, for being a ‘rotten snitch’. 

The Fox News correspondent made the comments during his appearance on Fox & Friends on Friday morning.  

‘So it’s going to be the president of the United States in a conversation that was intercepted by rotten snitch. I’d love to whap him,’ Rivera said of the whistleblower. 

‘This poor president. His whole tenure in office has been marked by snitches and rats and backstabbers. It’s amazing how he functions at all,’ the conservative pundit added. 

The whistleblower Rivera was referring too filed a complaint that helped kick start an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. 

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Geraldo Rivera (pictured) has slammed the intelligence whistleblower, who helped expose Donald Trump 's call with Ukraine 's president, for being a 'rotten snitch'

Geraldo Rivera (pictured) has slammed the intelligence whistleblower, who helped expose Donald Trump ‘s call with Ukraine ‘s president, for being a ‘rotten snitch’

On Monday, it was reported that since making the complaint, the whistleblower fears for his life.

Andrew Bakaj, the lead attorney for the whistleblower, said he has ‘serious concerns for our client’s personal safety’ after Trump compared the act of exposing him to ‘treason’ and suggested using the death penalty. 

He also revealed the existence of a $50,000 ‘bounty’ that has been offered for ‘any information’ about the whistleblower, who is known to be a CIA agent who at one time worked at the White House. 

The whistleblower Rivera was referring too filed a complaint that helped kick start an impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump

The whistleblower Rivera was referring too filed a complaint that helped kick start an impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump

In a letter to Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire, Bakaj suggests that the whistleblower has received some form of security assistance from federal authorities, and thanks the director for ‘ensuring their safety’.

The existence of the call prompted Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump, with House committees due to depose State Department officials linked to Trump’s dealings with Ukraine this week.

He wrote: ‘The purpose of this letter is to formally notify you of serious concerns we have regarding our client’s personal safety. 

‘We appreciate your office’s support thus far to activate appropriate resources to ensure their safety.

‘The events of the past week have heightened our concerns that our client’s identity will be disclosed publicly and that, as a result, our client will be put in harm’s way. On September 26, 2019, the President of the United States said the following:

“I want to know whose the person that gave the Whistleblower the information, because that’s close to a spy. You know what we used to do in the old days when we were smart? Right? With spies and treason, right? We used to handle them a little differently than we do now.”

‘The fact that the President’s statement was directed to “the person that gave the Whistleblower the information” does nothing to assuage our concerns for our client’s safety.  

On Monday, it was reported that since making the complaint, the whistleblower fears for his life. In a letter (above) addressed to Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire, the legal team also revealed the existence of a $50K bounty for 'information' on their client

On Monday, it was reported that since making the complaint, the whistleblower fears for his life. In a letter (above) addressed to Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire, the legal team also revealed the existence of a $50K bounty for ‘information’ on their client

‘Unfortunately, we expect this situation to worsen, and to become even more dangerous for our client and any other whistleblowers, as Congress seeks to investigate this matter.’ 

The House Intelligence Committee has said it will be ready to hear from the whistleblower ‘very soon’ at a private meeting to hide their identity. 

The existence of the letter was first revealed by CBS’s 60 Minutes after Trump said he has a right to meet the person who triggered an impeachment probe against him.

Battling the deepest crisis of his presidency, Trump has railed against assertions that he should be impeached for urging Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden, his potential 2020 White House challenger.

‘Like every American, I deserve to meet my accuser, especially when this accuser, the so-called “Whistleblower,” represented a perfect conversation with a foreign leader in a totally inaccurate and fraudulent way,’ Trump wrote in a tweet Sunday.

Trump accused top Democratic lawmaker Adam Schiff of lying to Congress last week about what Trump said to Zelensky in the July phone call.

‘He wrote down and read terrible things, then said it was from the mouth of the President of the United States. I want Schiff questioned at the highest level for Fraud & Treason,’ he wrote.

Trump’s Republican aides have sought to turn the tables on Democrats pushing for his impeachment, insisting that the president was the true ‘whistleblower’ as he had asked Ukraine to investigate Biden and his son for corruption. 

Battling the deepest crisis of his presidency, Trump has railed against assertions that he should be impeached for urging Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky (left) to investigate Joe Biden, his potential 2020 White House challenger

Battling the deepest crisis of his presidency, Trump has railed against assertions that he should be impeached for urging Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky (left) to investigate Joe Biden, his potential 2020 White House challenger

‘This individual is a saboteur trying to undermine a democratically elected government,’ Trump advisor Stephen Miller insisted on Fox News Sunday.

‘Getting to the bottom of a corruption scandal in Ukraine is in the American national interest.’

Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani – who has emerged as his point man in the Ukraine scandal – led the charge along with Miller in combative Sunday talk show appearances.  

Brandishing what he said were affidavits incriminating Biden’s son Hunter over his work at a Ukrainian company, Giuliani said Trump was duty bound to raise the issue with Kiev.

‘If he hadn’t asked them to investigate Biden, he would have violated the constitution,’ Giuliani told ABC’s This Week, charging that ‘Donald Trump was framed by the Democrats.’

The Democratic-led House of Representatives launched an official impeachment inquiry last week accusing Trump of a ‘mafia-like shakedown’ of Zelensky aimed at damaging Biden.

Trump and his allies claim Biden, as Barack Obama’s vice president, pressured Kiev to fire the country’s top prosecutor to protect his son Hunter, who sat on the board of a gas company, Burisma Holdings, accused of corrupt practices.

Those allegations have largely been debunked and there has been no evidence of illegal conduct or wrongdoing in Ukraine by the Bidens.

But a transcript of the July call shows Trump pushing for Kiev to revisit the matter, saying both Giuliani and US Attorney General Bill Barr would be in touch.

For Democrats, that amounted to a smoking gun, leading Speaker Nancy Pelosi to finally approve an impeachment process she opposed as a risky distraction from the 2020 battle.

Democrats have said articles of impeachment – formal charges – against Trump could be completed in as little as a month and swiftly voted on in the House, where the party has a majority.

The Biden campaign sent a letter Sunday to US TV networks to demanding they stop booking Giuliani for interviews, accusing him of ‘knowingly and willingly’ lying.

Polls suggest public support is growing for the impeachment inquiry, with a new CBS survey showing 55 percent of Americans – and nine in 10 Democrats – approve.

But even if impeachment is approved in the House, Trump would be tried in the Senate – where, for the moment, he appears able to count on a Republican majority to prevent conviction.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? THE VERY COMPLICATED STEPS INVOLVED IN IMPEACHING DONALD TRUMP

Nancy Pelosi announcing a formal impeachment investigation is only the start of what will be an epic legal and constitutional clash.

Here is how impeachment goes from here.

1) Investigations step up

Six committees are now tasked by Pelosi with investigating Donald Trump with the intention of deciding whether he should be impeached. They are the House Judiciary, Oversight, Intelligence, Ways and Means, Financial Services and Foreign Affairs committees. All of them are now likely to issue a flurry of subpoenas which is certain to lead to a new: 

2) Court battle over subpoenas – which could go to the Supreme Court

The Trump administration has so far resisted subpoenas by claiming executive privilege and is certain to continue to do so. Federal judges are already dealing with litigation over subpoenas for Trump’s tax and financial records and many more cases are likely to follow. But the courts have never settled the limits of executive privilege and whether an impeachment inquiry effectively gives Congress more power to overcome it. If Trump fights as hard as he can, it is likely to make its way to the Supreme Court. In the meantime, expect: 

3) More hearings

Democrats know they need to convince the public that Trump needs to be put on trial and the best way to do that is hearings like those which electrified the nation during Watergate. They botched the Mueller hearing but if they produce question and answer sessions with people from Trump-world which cause public outrage, they are on their way to:

4) Drawing up formal articles of impeachment in committee 

The charge sheet for impeachment – the ‘articles’ – set out what Trump is formally accused of. It has no set format – it can be as long or as short as Congress decides. Three such set of articles have been drawn up – for Andrew Johnson on 1868, Richard Nixon in 1974, and Bill Clinton in 1998. Johnson’s were the most extensive at 11, Nixon faced three, and Bill Clinton four but with a series of numbered charges in each article. Once drawn up, the judicial committee votes on them and if approved, sends them to the House for:

5) Full floor vote on impeachment

The constitution says the House needs a simple majority to proceed, but has to vote on each article. Nixon quit before such a vote so Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton are the only precedent. The House passed two out of the three articles against Clinton and all 11 against Johnson. Passing even one article leads to:

6) Senate impeachment trial

Even if the Senate is clearly not in favor of removing the president, it has to stage a trial if the House votes for impeachment. The hearing is in not in front of the full Senate, but ‘evidentiary committees’ – in theory at least similar to the existing Senate committees. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over it, but the procedures are set by senators. Members of the House prosecute Trump as ‘managers,’ bringing witnesses and presenting evidence to set out their case against the president. The president can defend himself, or, as Clinton did, use attorneys to cross-examine the witnesses. The committee or committees report to the full Senate. Then it can debate in public or deliberate in private on the guilt or innocence of the president. It holds a single open floor vote which will deliver:

7) The verdict

Impeachment must be by two-thirds of the Senate. Voting for impeachment on any one article is good enough to remove the president from office. There is no appeal. 





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