The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have arrived in Cape Town for their first tour of Africa with their son Archie, which will begin with a visit to a township known as the country’s ‘murder capital’ later today. 

Harry and Meghan will visit Nyanga in the Cape Flats, just outside of Cape Town today, where one in 206 people are killed each year, according to recent statistics.

The couple’s visit has been arranged amid a major security presence, with details kept secret until the last minute to prevent unrest.

Their four-month-old son, Archie, who is travelling with them, will remain at their residence with his nanny.

The family-of-three arrived at Cape Town International 40 minutes late this morning following their overnight British Airways flight from London. 

Beaming, Meghan, 38, was pictured carrying baby Archie, who sported an adorable bobble hat for the occasion. 

The young royal bore a striking resemblance to his father, now 34, who was pictured wearing a similar hat in the arms of his mother, Diana 18 years ago. 

Harry (left) and Megan (centre) are pictured arriving in Cape Town this morning with baby their son Archie

Harry (left) and Megan (centre) are pictured arriving in Cape Town this morning with baby their son Archie 

The Duke of Sussex is pictured beaming as a smiling Meghan follows behind with four-month-old Archie in her arms as they get off their British Airways flight in Cape Town this morning

Pictured today: Harry and Meghan get off the plane in Cape Town, South Africa

The Duke of Sussex is pictured beaming as a smiling Meghan follows behind with four-month-old Archie in her arms as they get off their British Airways flight in Cape Town this morning

Harry yesterday said he ‘couldn’t wait’ to introduce his son to Africa ahead of the trip this morning. 

The couple’s first stop, Nyanga, whose name means ‘moon’ in the local dialect of Xhosa, is one of the oldest black townships in Cape Town and was established in 1946 as a result of the migrant labour system.

Nowadays, unemployment is well above 50 per cent and HIV/Aids is a huge community issue.

Although residents were active in joining the national protests against the apartheid laws passed in 1960, it has become notorious for black on black violence, which was exploited by the local police.

Crime is still rampant, despite many admirable community initiatives, not only having the highest murder rate in the country but topping the lists for car jacking and having a reputation for house robbery. Last year there were a reported 308 murders. 

Primary school children in the area gathered to greet the royals this morning, with an impressive display of traditional dancing.  

The couple will be visiting a Justice Desk initiative in Nyanga township, which teaches children about their rights, self-awareness and safety, and provides self-defence classes and female empowerment training to young girls in the community.

The Justice Desk is an NGO supported by The Queen’s Commonwealth Trust, of which Harry serves as President and Meghan as Vice-President.

To date, the Justice Desk has directly assisted over 35,000 individuals, schools and communities.

The couple are pictured right carrying their baby son through Cape Town International Airport this morning

The couple are pictured right carrying their baby son through Cape Town International Airport this morning 

The Sussexes are pictured arriving on a royal tour as a family-of-three for the first time after their plane touched down in Cape Town this morning

The Sussexes are pictured arriving on a royal tour as a family-of-three for the first time after their plane touched down in Cape Town this morning 

The Duke of Sussex is pictured waving to crowds as he steps off the plane in Cape Town this morning with wife Meghan and son Archie following closely behind

The Duke of Sussex is pictured waving to crowds as he steps off the plane in Cape Town this morning with wife Meghan and son Archie following closely behind 

Primary school children in Nyanga gathered to greet the royals this morning, with an impressive display of traditional dancing

Primary school children in Nyanga gathered to greet the royals this morning, with an impressive display of traditional dancing

Members of the Nyanga community gathered to watch dancers entertain as they prepared to welcome Harry and Meghan

Members of the Nyanga community gathered to watch dancers entertain as they prepared to welcome Harry and Meghan 

Harry and Meghan's first stop - Nyanga (pictured) - is considered South Africa's 'murder capital' where one in 206 people are killed each year

Harry and Meghan’s first stop – Nyanga (pictured) – is considered South Africa’s ‘murder capital’ where one in 206 people are killed each year 

Nyanga: The ‘murder capital’ of South Africa 

Nyanga is one of the oldest black townships in Cape Town, established in 1946 under the Apartheid migrant labour system. Its name means ‘moon’ in the local dialect of Xhosa.

In 1948 migrants were forced to settle in Nyanga as nearby Langa became too small.

It is situated along the N2 highway close to the city’s only airport, Cape Town International, and other deprived townships of Gugulethu and Crossroads.

It is known as the ‘murder capital’ of South Africa, with an average of one in 206 people killed each year.

There has been 6.2 per cent decrease in the number of murder cases in the area for the year 2018/2019, but still remains the most deadly in the country. It also has a reputation for car-jacking and robberies.

Unemployment is currently well above 50 per cent and HIV/AIDS continues to be hugely prevalent.

Nyanga residents were active in joining the national protests against apartheid laws passed in 1960, but later became notorious for black-on-black violence after tensions were ramped up by local police.

They were also heavily involved in the 1976 student uprisings triggered after Afrikaans became South Africa’s first official language in schools.

Black-on-black faction fighting continued into the 1980s, when police officers were accused of exacerbating tensions along community lines.

Nyanga is made up of nine smaller townships (Lusaka, KTC, Old Location, Maumau, Zwelitsha, Maholweni ‘Hostels’, Black City, White City, Barcelona, Kanana and Europe).

On arrival at Nyanga Methodist Church, the Duke and Duchess will meet Jessica Dewhurst, Justice Desk Founder and Queen’s Young Leader, and Theodora Luthuli, Justice Desk Community Leader.

Jessica will take them on a walking tour of various activities taking place.

Moving into the learning centre, Theodora will then introduce the couple to her mother and the centre’s founder, Sylvia Hobe.

Their Royal Highnesses will then observe the Mbokodo Girls’ Empowerment programme, which provides self-defence classes and female empowerment training to young girls who have suffered major trauma.

The project’s motto is, ‘waithint’ abafazi wathint’imbokodo’ – when you strike a women; you strike a rock.

The session will begin with the students reciting ‘Our Deepest Fear,’ the club’s anthem, and then the girls will then break off into four training groups.

Harry and Meghan will be escorted around the groups by and learn about the purpose of each of the activities, before coming back together to form a circle where the girls will have an opportunity to have a discussion with them privately.

Afterwards, Their Royal Highnesses will leave the learning centre, followed by the girls singing their team anthem.

Harry and Meghan will each, unusually, make a short address, followed by a presentation of a gift from the Justice Desk, and a group photo, before departing.

Speaking in advance of the tour last night, a Buckingham Palace spokeswoman said: ‘Their Royal Highnesses are very much looking forward to their arrival in Africa tomorrow on their first official tour as a family.

‘As you well know Africa holds a very special place in the Duke’s heart and he is looking forward to sharing South Africa with the duchess and their son.

‘It is a really busy programme, four countries in ten days, and we have an extra special small passenger to make things more lively. ‘

It is still not yet known, however, whether the public or media will get to see little Archie, seventh in line to the throne, in person. 

‘We are still not in a position to confirm anything,’ a spokeswoman said.

The couple are flying in on a commercial flight from the UK but have decided not to arrange any kind of official arrival.

Archie's bobble hat bears a striking resemblance to the one Prince Harry wore as a toddler in January 2001. He is pictured with his mother Princess Diana getting off a plane at Aberdeen Airport

Pictured: Baby Prince Harry with mother Diana in Aberdeen in January 2001

Archie’s bobble hat bears a striking resemblance to the one Prince Harry wore as a toddler in January 2001. He is pictured with his mother Princess Diana getting off a plane at Aberdeen Airport 

Instead they intend to slip through a VIP exit and head to to their home for the week — believed to be the High Commissioner’s residence in the city – to settle him down with his nanny before heading off on their first engagement.

Due to an increase in crime and recent demonstrations against appalling levels of violence against women, the heightened security situation in South Africa currently means that many of the couple’s engagements cannot be announced in advance.

But as well as venturing into a township later today, it can be confirmed that they will visit District Six, once home to large swathes of the Cape Malay population who were forcibly removed under the apartheid regime.

It is understood that Meghan and Harry will be attending a cookery event where it is anticipated that the Duchess will swap the charity cookbook she brought out with the women of The Hubb Community Kitchen to benefit those affected by the Grenfell Tower tragedy for some local recipes.

And later in the week Meghan will attend an event with a local group which helps mothers living with HIV where she is expected to bring some of Archie’s hand-me downs to pass on to those in need, as well as colouring books and pens.

Nyanga (residents pictured) is one of the oldest black townships in Cape Town, established in 1946 under the Apartheid migrant labour system

Nyanga (residents pictured) is one of the oldest black townships in Cape Town, established in 1946 under the Apartheid migrant labour system

A source said: ‘The Duke and Duchess were inundated with gifts for baby Archie from organisations and the general public.

‘They were incredibly grateful but one little baby can only wear so many clothes and he’s growing fast!

‘So the Duchess decided to being a number of his presents to hand on to South African children and families most in need.

‘She’ll take a selection of clothes, books and pens to themothers2mothers charity which help families with HIV.’

As revealed by the Mail on Saturday, a significant number of their engagements will focus on the issue of gender-based violence, which is dominating the South African national agenda.

The country’s President, Cyril Ramaphosa, has said publicly that it one of the most dangerous places in the world for women to live in, which a huge upsurge in violence directed at females.

Speaking in advance of the tour last night, a Buckingham Palace spokeswoman said: ‘Their Royal Highnesses are very much looking forward to their arrival in Africa tomorrow on their first official tour as a family.

‘As you well know Africa holds a very special place in the Duke’s heart and he is looking forward to sharing South Africa with the duchess and their son.

‘It is a really busy programme, four countries in ten days, and we have an extra special small passenger to make things more lively. ‘

It is still not yet known, however, whether the public or media will get to see little Archie, seventh in line to the throne, in person. 

‘We are still not in a position to confirm anything,’ a spokeswoman said.

The couple are flying in on a commercial flight from the UK but have decided not to arrange any kind of official arrival.

Instead they intend to slip through a VIP exit and head to to their home for the week — believed to be the High Commissioner’s residence in the city – to settle him down with his nanny before heading off on their first engagement.

Due to an increase in crime and recent demonstrations against appalling levels of violence against women, the heightened security situation in South Africa currently means that many of the couple’s engagements cannot be announced in advance.

But as well as venturing into a township later today, it can be confirmed that they will visit District Six, once home to large swathes of the Cape Malay population who were forcibly removed under the apartheid regime.

It is understood that Meghan and Harry will be attending a cookery event where it is anticipated that the Duchess will swap the charity cookbook she brought out with the women of The Hubb Community Kitchen to benefit those affected by the Grenfell Tower tragedy for some local recipes.

And later in the week Meghan will attend an event with a local group which helps mothers living with HIV where she is expected to bring some of Archie’s hand-me downs to pass on to those in need, as well as colouring books and pens.

A source said: ‘The Duke and Duchess were inundated with gifts for baby Archie from organisations and the general public.

‘They were incredibly grateful but one little baby can only wear so many clothes and he’s growing fast!

‘So the Duchess decided to being a number of his presents to hand on to South African children and families most in need.

‘She’ll take a selection of clothes, books and pens to themothers2mothers charity which help families with HIV.’

As revealed by the Mail on Saturday, a significant number of their engagements will focus on the issue of gender-based violence, which is dominating the South African national agenda.

The country’s President, Cyril Ramaphosa, has said publicly that it one of the most dangerous places in the world for women to live in, which a huge upsurge in violence directed at females.



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