A woman who skipped school as a teenager in order to see Prince Charles at Cairns Airport in 1979 has greeted the heir to the throne nearly 40 years after their first encounter.

Leila Sherwood, who made headlines at the age of 14 when she gave the British royal a kiss, greeted the Prince once again outside St John the Evangelist Church on Sunday.

Clutching a newspaper clipping from the time, the now 54-year-old was delighted to see Prince Charles.

She said: ‘He held my hand and said “bless you” – I didn’t want to let go of his hand!’, reported the Bendigo Advertiser.

A woman who skipped school as a teenager in order to see Prince Charles at Cairns Airport in 1979 has greeted the heir to the throne nearly 40 years after their first encounter (pictured together in Cairns)

A woman who skipped school as a teenager in order to see Prince Charles at Cairns Airport in 1979 has greeted the heir to the throne nearly 40 years after their first encounter (pictured together in Cairns)

A woman who skipped school as a teenager in order to see Prince Charles at Cairns Airport in 1979 has greeted the heir to the throne nearly 40 years after their first encounter (pictured together in Cairns)

Leila Sherwood (pictured), who made headlines at the age of 14 when she gave the British royal a kiss, greeted the prince once again outside St John the Evangelist Church on Sunday with the newspaper clipping from the time

Leila Sherwood (pictured), who made headlines at the age of 14 when she gave the British royal a kiss, greeted the prince once again outside St John the Evangelist Church on Sunday with the newspaper clipping from the time

Prince Charles also greeted the Bishop of north Queensland (pictured)

Prince Charles also greeted the Bishop of north Queensland (pictured)

Leila Sherwood (left), who made headlines at the age of 14 when she gave the British royal a kiss, greeted the prince once again outside St John the Evangelist Church on Sunday with the newspaper clipping from the time – Prince Charles also greeted the Bishop of north Queensland (right)

Leila said of their second meeting: 'He held my hand and said "bless you" - I didn't want to let go of his hand!' (both pictured outside the church)

Leila said of their second meeting: 'He held my hand and said "bless you" - I didn't want to let go of his hand!' (both pictured outside the church)

Leila said of their second meeting: ‘He held my hand and said “bless you” – I didn’t want to let go of his hand!’ (both pictured outside the church)

For the Sunday church service, Leila (pictured with Prince Charles) wore a black and red floral outfit, complete with a flower in her hair

For the Sunday church service, Leila (pictured with Prince Charles) wore a black and red floral outfit, complete with a flower in her hair

For the Sunday church service, Leila (pictured with Prince Charles) wore a black and red floral outfit, complete with a flower in her hair

She wasn't the only delighted well wisher who travelled far and wide to see the heir to the throne (pictured with her newspaper clipping from 1979)

She wasn't the only delighted well wisher who travelled far and wide to see the heir to the throne (pictured with her newspaper clipping from 1979)

She wasn’t the only delighted well wisher who travelled far and wide to see the heir to the throne (pictured with her newspaper clipping from 1979)

Leila wasn’t the only person from Far North Queensland who came out to see the British royal. 

The 59-year-old was also greeted by the Bishop of north Queensland, alongside parishioners including those who provided Anglicare services to the community – before he attended a regular service alongside parishioners at 10.30am on Sunday. 

An Aboriginal woman named after Queen Elizabeth was overcome with emotion while meeting the Prince.

Elizabeth Kulla Kulla yelled out to the heir to the throne from behind the barricade as he left a church service at St John the Evangelist Anglican Church on Sunday morning.

‘Excuse me Prince Charles, can I shake your hand?,’ she said. ‘I’m an Aboriginal woman, please can I shake your hand for the first time.’ 

Prince Charles attended a regular service alongside parishioners at 10.30am on Sunday (pictured)

Prince Charles attended a regular service alongside parishioners at 10.30am on Sunday (pictured)

Prince Charles attended a regular service alongside parishioners at 10.30am on Sunday (pictured)

An Aboriginal woman named after Queen Elizabeth was overcome with emotion while meeting he prince (both pictured)

An Aboriginal woman named after Queen Elizabeth was overcome with emotion while meeting he prince (both pictured)

An Aboriginal woman named after Queen Elizabeth was overcome with emotion while meeting he prince (both pictured)

Elizabeth Kulla Kulla yelled out to the heir to the throne from behind the barricade as he left a church service at St John the Evangelist Anglican Church on Sunday morning (both pictured)

Elizabeth Kulla Kulla yelled out to the heir to the throne from behind the barricade as he left a church service at St John the Evangelist Anglican Church on Sunday morning (both pictured)

Elizabeth Kulla Kulla yelled out to the heir to the throne from behind the barricade as he left a church service at St John the Evangelist Anglican Church on Sunday morning (both pictured)

The royal spent 15 minutes mingling with the congregation over a cup of tea after the church service, before he departed for a tour of HMAS Cairns (pictured)

The royal spent 15 minutes mingling with the congregation over a cup of tea after the church service, before he departed for a tour of HMAS Cairns (pictured)

The royal spent 15 minutes mingling with the congregation over a cup of tea after the church service, before he departed for a tour of HMAS Cairns (pictured)

Charles immediately walked over to Ms Kulla Kulla and shook her hand, as she told him she was named after his mother.

Following the interaction the young woman collapsed in tears into the arms of her sister.

Still overcome with emotion a few minutes later, Ms Kulla Kulla said it was the first time she had seen a prince in real life.

‘I don’t know he’s going to come to me,’ she said.

Charles immediately walked over to Ms Kulla Kulla and shook her hand, as she told him she was named after his mother (pictured together)

Charles immediately walked over to Ms Kulla Kulla and shook her hand, as she told him she was named after his mother (pictured together)

Charles immediately walked over to Ms Kulla Kulla and shook her hand, as she told him she was named after his mother (pictured together)

Prince Charles (pictured on Sunday) was later given a copy of author Pamela Allen's, Who Sank The Boat? by Townsville woman, Alycia Loane, who wanted him to give it to Princess Charlotte and Prince George's new sibling when they are born

Prince Charles (pictured on Sunday) was later given a copy of author Pamela Allen's, Who Sank The Boat? by Townsville woman, Alycia Loane, who wanted him to give it to Princess Charlotte and Prince George's new sibling when they are born

Prince Charles (pictured on Sunday) was later given a copy of author Pamela Allen’s, Who Sank The Boat? by Townsville woman, Alycia Loane, who wanted him to give it to Princess Charlotte and Prince George’s new sibling when they are born

Prince Charles will go home with a special gift for his newest grandchild, who is due this month.

Townsville woman Alycia Loane travelled four and a half hours from Townsville to give him a copy of author Pamela Allen’s, Who Sank The Boat?

Ms Loane said it was her children’s favourite book, so she wanted to pass it onto Prince George, Princess Charlotte and their new baby brother or sister.

‘He asked if it was for him and I said “oh no not really but if you could please pass it on, on our behalf”,’ Ms Loane said. 

The royal spent 15 minutes mingling with the congregation over a cup of tea after the church service, before he departed for a tour of HMAS Cairns. 

Later on Sunday, Prince Charles met with defence personnel at HMAS Cairns (pictured)

Later on Sunday, Prince Charles met with defence personnel at HMAS Cairns (pictured)

Later on Sunday, Prince Charles met with defence personnel at HMAS Cairns (pictured)

He presented The Duke of Gloucester Cup (pictured) at HMAS Cairns, before the 69-year-old departs for Darwin

He presented The Duke of Gloucester Cup (pictured) at HMAS Cairns, before the 69-year-old departs for Darwin

He presented The Duke of Gloucester Cup (pictured) at HMAS Cairns, before the 69-year-old departs for Darwin

Since he arrived in Australia for the Commonwealth Games, Prince Charles has been enjoying a packed-out schedule (pictured at HMAS Cairns)

Since he arrived in Australia for the Commonwealth Games, Prince Charles has been enjoying a packed-out schedule (pictured at HMAS Cairns)

Since he arrived in Australia for the Commonwealth Games, Prince Charles has been enjoying a packed-out schedule (pictured at HMAS Cairns)

Since he arrived in Australia for the Commonwealth Games, Prince Charles has been enjoying a packed-out schedule.

As well as speaking at an event in Brisbane, attending the Commonwealth Games Opening Ceremony, touring the famous local rum distillery in Bundaberg and visiting Port Vila Central Hospital and Great Barrier Reef, the prince also made a day trip to the South Pacific island of Vanuatu on Saturday.

Donning a grass skirt and a white garland, the heir to the throne was made a high chief in a colourful ceremony.

In the tradition of the Malvatumauri Council of Chiefs, Charles took part in a series of rituals as he was given the high chief name of Mal Menaringmanu.

The Prince also took a sip from a cup of special kava, known as Royal Kava, before planting two trees.

The drink is reserved for special occasions and was only last consumed when the Duke of Edinburgh visited the island in 1974.

He delighted the crowds – who had turned out in their thousands – with the traditional greeting of ‘Halo yufala euriwan’, meaning ‘hello everybody’. 

The prince has emphasised his fondness for Australia, which he first visited 52 years ago (pictured at HMAS Cairns)

The prince has emphasised his fondness for Australia, which he first visited 52 years ago (pictured at HMAS Cairns)

The prince has emphasised his fondness for Australia, which he first visited 52 years ago (pictured at HMAS Cairns)

'When I first came to Australia, Australian manhood was partly defined by how many schooners of beer you could line up on the bar - and drink - before the pubs closed early,' Prince Charles (pictured) said

'When I first came to Australia, Australian manhood was partly defined by how many schooners of beer you could line up on the bar - and drink - before the pubs closed early,' Prince Charles (pictured) said

‘When I first came to Australia, Australian manhood was partly defined by how many schooners of beer you could line up on the bar – and drink – before the pubs closed early,’ Prince Charles (pictured) said

The next leg of his trip will see Prince Charles head to Darwin, where he will conclude his time in Australia.

The Prince has emphasised his fondness for Australia, which he first visited 52 years ago.

‘When I first came to Australia, Australian manhood was partly defined by how many schooners of beer you could line up on the bar – and drink – before the pubs closed early,’ he said.

Highlighting once again the challenges facing the environment, he warned that ‘we are destroying our own life support systems, along with our children’s and grandchildren’s’ future’.

Describing Australia as ‘an example for us all’, Charles hailed ‘Aussie values’ as a force for good.

He added: ‘Amidst all this, the Aussie character that is so exemplified by the concept of fairness and ‘fairgo’ is what I believe the world needs so desperately and so urgently – a ‘fairgo’ for people, our planet and for nature herself’.





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